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Men's Olympic road race: Nearly 5,000 altimeters and climbs instill fear |  the Olympics

Men’s Olympic road race: Nearly 5,000 altimeters and climbs instill fear | the Olympics

We start where the decision can be made. Mikuni Pass looms about 34 kilometers from the end. Climb 6.5 kilometers with an average incline of at least 10.6%. Some pieces reach 17 and even 21%. With a 4 km stretch of climbing an average of 12%.

“After the Mikone pass, you have a small descent, a flat part, a climb and then a long descent towards the finish line. What is to be corrected and who is going to do that? A very special course,” commentator Jose de Coeur already lost.

Of course, the Mikuni Pass isn’t the only bite the knights have to digest. After 80 kilometers, the first ascent follows Doshi Road, which has an elevation of 5.9 kilometers at a gradient of 5.7%. So, warm up, but soon follows the Kagusaka Pass (2.2 kilometers at 4.6%).

It then circles Mount Fuji towards Fuji Sanroku (14.3 km at 6%), Mikuni Pass and for the second time Kagusaka Pass. Then it is up to drop. The end is at Fuji International Speedway.

“Not every country can have 2 to 3 strikers,” de Kauer sees opportunities for the Belgians. “Most countries only come with one real hero, max 2.”

With the shape of Wout van Aert and Remco Evenepoel—who set their sights on gaming—our country has solid irons on fire. Tiesj Benoot, Greg Van Avermaet and Mauri Vansevenant completed the Belgian team.

The race will start at 4am BST and usually arrive around 11am.

“The men’s race is much more difficult than the women’s,” said commentator Michael Wittes. On Sunday, July 25, it was the ladies’ turn. They will be displayed on a 137-kilometre track and 2,692 altimeters.

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The women do not cross the Mikuni Pass, but drive on Doshi Road and Kagusaka Pass. Our country delivers 3 road racers: Valerie Demme, Lotte Kubicki and Julie Van de Velde.