Cheraw Chronicle

Complete News World

Stephanie Dennis (Medan): “The need for climate-resilient cities that provide opportunities for entrepreneurs” - Companies

Stephanie Dennis (Medan): “The need for climate-resilient cities that provide opportunities for entrepreneurs” – Companies

“The consequences of climate change, such as increased heat stress in cities, droughts, floods, and sea-level rise, are not always on the business world’s agenda,” says Stephanie Deans, an urban architect and urban designer at Medan, and a member of Vrijdaggroep, a pluralistic think tank. .

“It is not enough that we fight for cities that we are happy to live in, we also have to make them climate resistant.” Dens refer to the many spatial toolboxes for urban heat stress and flooding. Some of these actions are small in themselves, like the famous ‘wippen tiles’, replacing paving stone with a small garden on the facade, but they fit in with a comprehensive approach to greening and making cities blue. Other options include more trees in the city, loosening parking lots and driveways so that the groundwater table can be renewed, or building green roofs and installing rain barrels that can collect rain for reuse.

“The pandemic has raised questions about the way our public space is being used,” says Stephanie Danes. “A good, livable public space suddenly became vital, especially at the height of the pandemic when meeting each other outside was the only means of socializing.”

“We are bound to commit ourselves on a large scale to water softening and buffering to replenish groundwater levels, and to greening. This is not only good for the environment, but green also has a cooling effect. You can also work with valleys. Meanwhile. In the day, such a valley can be A playground, but during heavy rain it can collect water. When designing public spaces, then it is important to take an artistic look. What is the direction? How much precipitation? According to the calculation, Antwerp, for example, has an ambitious water plan that redesigns the public space To anticipate periods of heavy rain or drought.

See also  PotatoEurope provides a space for Talent Scout Day

According to Dens, climate adaptation is by definition a public-private partnership and requires concrete actions in the short term and the design of a climate-resilient urban landscape in the long term, with achievable visions up to 2030, 2050 and 2100. You remember that thanks to government information on waterinfo.be or via Klimaat.vmm.be, individuals and business leaders can already research what will happen to their home or commercial complex in 2050 according to current climate scenarios. “Maybe this cheaper plot of land suddenly becomes less attractive because it is in a flood-prone area, or you start your business or your neighbors by building green roofs for cooling, or water roofs to set up a circular restroom again.” Every little helps, and every drop counts.

This is an excerpt from the Trends Guide to Sustainable Entrepreneurship. If you want more advice from sustainability experts and cases from leading companies, you can read this guide Here Ask for free.

“It is not enough that we fight for cities that we are happy to live in, we also have to make them climate resistant.” Dens refer to the many spatial toolboxes for urban heat stress and flooding. Some of these actions are small in themselves, like the famous ‘wippen tiles’, replacing paving stone with a small garden on the facade, but they fit in with a comprehensive approach to greening and making cities blue. Other options include more trees in the city, loosening parking lots and driveways so that the groundwater table can be renewed, or building green roofs and installing rain barrels that can collect rain for reuse. “The pandemic has raised questions about the way our public space is being used,” says Stephanie Danes. “A good, livable public space suddenly became vital, especially at the height of the pandemic when meeting each other outside was the only means of socializing.” “We are bound to commit ourselves on a large scale to water softening and buffering to replenish groundwater levels, and to greening. This is not only good for the environment, but green also has a cooling effect. You can also work with valleys. Meanwhile. In the day, such a valley can be A playground, but during heavy rain it can collect water. When designing public spaces, then it is important to take an artistic look. What is the direction? How much precipitation? According to the calculation, Antwerp, for example, has an ambitious water plan that redesigns the public space To anticipate periods of heavy rain or drought. According to Dens, climate adaptation is by definition a public-private partnership and requires concrete actions in the short term and the design of a climate-resilient urban landscape in the long term, with achievable visions up to 2030, 2050 and 2100. You remember that thanks to government information on waterinfo.be or via Klimaat.vmm.be, individuals and business leaders can already research what will happen to their home or commercial complex in 2050 according to current climate scenarios. “Maybe that cheaper plot of land suddenly becomes less attractive because it is in a flood-prone area, or you start your business or your neighbors by building green roofs for cooling, or water roofs to set up a circular restroom again.” Every little bit helps, and every drop counts. This is an excerpt from the Trends Guide to Sustainable Entrepreneurship. If you’d like more advice from sustainability experts and cases from leading companies, you can order this guide for free here.

See also  OSKA's new single - "Woodstock"