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The calling game on a British morning show was suddenly disrupted by a blunt phone call: "What's this?"  |TV

The calling game on a British morning show was suddenly disrupted by a blunt phone call: “What’s this?” |TV

televisionAn unexpected phone call suddenly disturbed the peace in the studio of the British morning show “This Morning.” Presenters got ‘red ears’ when the popular calling game ‘Spin To Win’ took a very obvious turn.

The live streaming game, where viewers have to connect to win prizes, wasn’t as innocent on Monday as it usually is. After all, the clip is suddenly interrupted by an explicit phone call: suddenly there are loud sounds of a woman moaning and gasping. Only after a few seconds the connection suddenly dropped.

Broadcasters Rochelle Humes and Craig Doyle were stunned and did not know what was happening to them. “I don’t know what it was, but I thought it was something,” Doyle tried to make light of the situation. While Rochelle Humes was clearly shocked by the unexpected turn of events. I suggested she “move on” with the show and tried to remain professional.

A wave of reactions

The fact that these sounds don’t fit into a family-friendly show is not lost on viewers. The incident sparked a wave of reactions on social media, and the public did not hide their astonishment and astonishment. “What is this?!” asked one confused viewer. Or also: “How could this happen? And who the hell was this caller?” and “What does he look like!” Please tell me this is a joke.”

Although there was some fun, presenter Rochelle was really upset with how things turned out. When the “Spin To Win” segment ended, she said: “Can you tell I’m really upset?”

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