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Interwar home in Roeselare wins the Immovable Heritage Award...

Interwar home in Roeselare wins the Immovable Heritage Award…

Flemish Heritage Minister Matthias Depanelli has awarded the 2021 Immovable Heritage Award to the residents of an interwar house designed by architect Josef de Bruecker. This heritage building in Roeselare also won the Audience Award based on a survey of more than 5,000 people. Natuurpunt Lommel volunteers receive an honorable mention from the jury. They have worked to preserve and restore the Grote Watering’s floodplains for over forty years.

winner

The interwar house by Joseph De Bruycker in Roeselare is a three-fronted house from 1932 commissioned by De Buscher-Declercq, owner of the concrete company Declercq.

The first floor house is a complete work of art designed by Flemish architect Josef de Bruecker with interior design in collaboration with artist Victor Cerfranks and garden designed by André Rousseau. The building was protected by the Flemish government in 2001 due to its artistic, architectural, historical, social and cultural value. Minister Debendaele: The original details, like one of the first Quebecs’ kitchens, make it an impressive time capsule. Restoration is the life’s work of the residents. With the works carried out, they once again upgraded their homes to an example of interwar architecture; Ready for a new chapter.

And the jury is also full of praise: “The owners bought this home due to problems such as water leaks, inadequate insulation, and outdated aluminum joinery. They hired the right people for the restoration and kept working on their dreams step by step. They have always chosen to conserve and restore, although sometimes replacement has been easier or cheaper.

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Interwar home in Roeselare won the Real Estate Award 2021
Interwar home in Roeselare won the Real Estate Award 2021

Honorable Mention to Natuurpunt Lommel Volunteers

The Grote Watering Plains constitute a unique historical and cultural landscape. Natuurpunt Lommel has been restoring and restoring it for over forty years.

The project is a prime example of sustainability in many meanings of the word: it has a significant environmental impact, preserves historical landscapes (tangible heritage) and ensures that the ancient technique of bleaching is not lost but is passed on to the next generation (intangible heritage). 15 hectares of neglected irrigation ponds have been converted into working irrigation lawns. Volunteers are taking all kinds of initiatives to protect both landscape and use, which are closely related, for the future, says Minister Dependail.

Interwar home in Roeselare won the Real Estate Award 2021
Flowing meadows in Lommel

The Immovable Heritage Award rewards recent achievements in the field of antiquities care, landscape care and archaeology. The sixth edition of the award focused on heritage unavailable to the public. Among the 28 nominees, an external jury nominated the Palace of Hotel d’Udekem d’Acoz in Leuven, the interwar house of Joseph de Bruecker in Rosselare, and the villa of Mont-Désière in Wemel. Each winner will win €2,500. The winner will also receive €12,500, which is €15,000 in total.