Cheraw Chronicle

Complete News World

Better air quality lowers dementia risk

Better air quality lowers dementia risk

Improving air quality reduces the risk of dementia in older adults. This is evidenced by various studies presented this week at an international conference on Alzheimer’s disease.

Previous research has suggested a link between air pollution and the buildup of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease. New studies show that improving air quality can lead to a lower risk of dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease.

Particles and nitrogen

For example, US researchers have found that air pollution by particulate matter and nitrogen has improved significantly in different regions of the United States. They were able to show that a 10 percent improvement reduced the risk of dementia in American women aged 74 to 92 by 14 to 26 percent. Researchers among 7,000 elderly French adults came to a similar conclusion: a drop in particulate concentrations between 1990 and 2000 reduced the risk of dementia by 15 percent and the risk of Alzheimer’s by 17 percent.

sheets

A third study of 3,000 Americans showed a strong link between exposure to air pollution and the production of proteins that are the main component of brain plaques. “We’ve known for some time that air pollution is bad for our brains and our health in general, including its link to amyloid buildup in the brain,” said Claire Sexton, director of science at the Alzheimer’s Association of America. But this data is hopeful because it shows that improving air quality can actually reduce the risk of dementia. It illustrates the importance of policies and measures taken by federal and local governments and corporations to reduce air pollutants.

See also  Arrange GTA games on PC by system requirements

Previous research has suggested a link between air pollution and the buildup of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease. New studies show that improving air quality can lead to a lower risk of dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease, for example, US researchers found that air pollution from particulate matter and nitrogen has improved significantly in several regions in the United States. They were able to show that a 10 percent improvement reduced the risk of dementia in American women aged 74 to 92 by 14 to 26 percent. Researchers among 7,000 elderly French people came to a similar conclusion: a decrease in particulate concentrations between 1990 and 2000 reduced the risk of dementia by 15 percent and the risk of Alzheimer’s by 17 percent. A third study of 3,000 Americans showed a strong association between exposure to air pollution and the production of proteins that are the main component of brain plaques. “We’ve known for some time that air pollution is bad for our brains and our health in general, including its link to amyloid buildup in the brain,” said Claire Sexton, director of science at the Alzheimer’s Association of America. But this data is hopeful because it shows that improving air quality can actually reduce the risk of dementia. It illustrates the importance of policies and measures taken by federal and local governments and corporations to reduce air pollutants.